Social justice on Super Bowl Sunday

What if our nation got as excited about the Gospel as we do sports? Or better yet, what if we got more excited about God than cheering for a team?

How different would this day be? How different would we be?

A wise Sister once pointed out to me that if we celebrated the liturgical seasons with the same fervor as we have for sport teams, then our whole society would be transformed. Maybe, I thought, things would seem more like the Reign of God that Christ proclaimed.

Can you imagine it? Our clothes colors could coordinate with the priest’s vestments. Instead of fancy stadiums, we’d have top-of-the-line community centers in every city so to better shelter the homeless, feed the hungry and heal the sick.  All people would have easy access to a vibrant worship community.  Upon waking, we’d read our Bibles instead of the sports page.

And, maybe instead of having Super Bowl parties today, we’d have parties to celebrate today’s feast: The Presentation of the Lord in the temple.

Here’s one thing that shouldn’t be hypothetical: We would be more concerned with the social injustices that happen behind the scenes at the Super Bowl.  We would be better in touch with the reality of inequality and violence that comes with all our American celebrations. This information would be common knowledge:

Our hearts would be involved with another awful injustice. For, even more alarming than the facts about wealth and poverty is the truth about what happens to many women on this day.

(Credit: http://www.policymic.com/articles/79235/you-ll-never-see-this-side-of-the-super-bowl-on-tv)
(Credit: http://www.policymic.com/articles/79235/you-ll-never-see-this-side-of-the-super-bowl-on-tv)

Read this article to learn about the horrific, true story about sex trafficking.

Then, join my community and me in prayer.

Go here to learn what else you can do to make a difference.

No matter what you do, I hope you’ll keep Christ part of your day! Peace!

set down the stones

I do not advise that young children watch this video.  The facts are very heavy and I believe its content is only appropriate for mature adults:

We’re approaching Jerusalem.  It is nearly time to wave branches and shout Hosanna’s.  We’ll rejoice with hope as our Love rides into town on a simple donkey.  Gathered around a dusty street we can reach out and trustingly hand Him the pains of the world.

We hope for a revolution, but will instead know redemption.

The redemption is enlightened empowerment. We’re all good, we’re all God’s children, all of us have rights because we all have dignity. It’s refreshing to be reminded. We have power to make changes. It’s awesome!

But, in the face of intense suffering, we’re overwhelmed and challenged.  We are stunned and slowed by the horror of children being used as sex slaves and other horrific sins.  How can we be the body of Christ and heal and help when the hurt is so extreme? How can we help others to know the sacredness of their own bodies and beings when they have never been told the truth?

How can we save the children?

The good news is that Jesus saves.  It’s not up to us to be messiahs, just helpers.  Christ’s power continues to unfold through us.  The Jerusalem story is our story.  Jesus has given us arms of love and compassion.  Jesus taught us how to set people free from the lies that enslave them.  We truly are instruments of peace.

It’s really hard work.  This love revolution won’t work if we’re judgmental or defensive, which is sometimes our automatic action.

Jesus went to the Mount of Olives.
But early in the morning he arrived again in the temple area,
and all the people started coming to him,
and he sat down and taught them.
Then the scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman
who had been caught in adultery
and made her stand in the middle.
They said to him,
“Teacher, this woman was caught
in the very act of committing adultery.
Now in the law, Moses commanded us to stone such women.
So what do you say?”
They said this to test him,
so that they could have some charge to bring against him.
Jesus bent down and began to write on the ground with his finger.
But when they continued asking him,
he straightened up and said to them,
“Let the one among you who is without sin
be the first to throw a stone at her.”
Again he bent down and wrote on the ground.
And in response, they went away one by one,
beginning with the elders.
So he was left alone with the woman before him.
Then Jesus straightened up and said to her,
“Woman, where are they?
Has no one condemned you?”
She replied, “No one, sir.”
Then Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you.
Go, and from now on do not sin any more.”     –Jn 8:1-11

These radical actions of compassion and forgiveness are daily acts of regular relationships and small communities.

Turning the awfulness to joy and justice is also the acts of nations.  The United States’ new federal budget just expanded defense spending by 5 billion dollars, while drastically cutting funding to programs that provide assistance to the poorest of the poor.  We’ve reduced our acts of love and compassion and increased defense.

These last days of lent free us from all the stones of sin that are too heavy for us to carry. In order to pick up our palm branches we need to set down our stones.

When, O humanity, will we ever set down our stones?!