Lent: Time to make some changes

Last week, I bemoaned Lent’s fast approach on Twitter:

Ready or not, Lent is here and it is time to get into it—time to get into the spirit of prayer, fasting and almsgiving in order to experience great conversion during this sacred season.

It’s time to make some changes.

On this Ash Wednesday we are marked with signs of Truth: all of us are sinners, all of us need to repent, all of us have humanity in common. The fact that we came from dirt and shall return to dirt is one of the great equalizers among us.

Photo credit: http://adamsartgallery.com/art-from-ashes/

Because we are not God we all are imperfect, and must work together for growth and development. No matter which Lenten practices we commit to today, let’s remember it takes a lot work—two months on average—to really change our habits.

The ashes say it: Lent is a time to remember how connected, how communal we’re designed to be. As we change and become better together, let us remain patient—let us be compassionate when changes come tough.

Together, then, changed by our Lenten practices and the grace of God, let us unite as one and return to God with all that we are.

Amen!

One thought on “Lent: Time to make some changes

  1. Thank you, Sister Julia!
    What has helped me to “get into it” is going to the movie Spotlight last night. How eloquently it tells the horror of the Boston Globe reporters as they uncovered the story of clergy sexual abuse and coverup. The images that stay with me the most are the changes in the young reporters as their Catholic faith was undercut by what they were learning. I’m asking God to use me as an instrument to heal and welcome, though I’m not sure just how that will be accomplished. I think how valuable it was to me to be able to respond to a 36-year-old homeless man in a shelter, who had been abused by his parish priest between the ages of 8 and 12, when he told his parents and they supported him. I said, “Al, I want to apologize to you on behalf of the Church for what happened. I have no authority in the Church, but I want to give you an apology for all the hurt you have suffered.” He gave me a big hug, and began to tell me weekly how his recovery was going. It was a huge gift to me!

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